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Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules: Avoid food products that have some form of sugar (or sweetener) listed among the top 3 ingredients

November 5, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

Food Rules: Avoid food products that have some form of sugar (or sweetener) listed among the top 3 ingredients

  • Labels list ingredients by weight…products with more sugar than any other ingredient is too much.
  • Complicated?  There are over 40 sugars used in processed foods…check the label.
  • “Sugar is sugar”  Organic sugar is sugar.

Source: Michael Pollen Food Rules

 

Rattlesnakes

November 5, 2012
Denise Simmons, Corporate Chef

Southwestern cuisine has gained significant popularity the past few years. We’ve had tex-mex (think Taco Bell) for many years, but I’m talking about a more authentic type of food, mixing southern US & Mexican cuisines to form a style unique to Arizona, New Mexico & southern California. I was born in Phoenix, AZ, so I was raised on tacos & chile rellenos, the way most American kids were raised on burgers & fries.

One of my favorite dishes has always been pinto beans. Dried beans, sorted carefully to pick out any bad beans or pebbles that may have gotten into them during harvesting. Slow cooked-all day-with lots of fresh garlic & onions. Occasionally some hatch chiles added for extra pizzazz. My folks have been
getting an amazing variety of pintos from my aunt & uncle in Colorado, where they’re grown (the beans, not my aunt & uncle..). The Colorado beans are smaller & a bit sweeter than the beans I remember from childhood.

I was at the Whole Foods grocery store in Charlottesville last week, and was pleasantly surprised to learn of a relatively new variety (a hybrid) of pintos called Rattlesnake Beans. I fell for the name alone, so definitely had to get some & see how they measure up! I cooked a small batch last week-just in time for taco Friday with my folks (a long standing family tradition!). They’re smaller than even the Colorado pintos, and a good bit sweeter & creamier as well. They cook up a bit darker-they almost look like a small red kidney bean. They were delicious, but I think we’ll be sticking with the Colorado pintos…it has a little bit to do with flavor, but I think more to do with tradition…

Whew

We’ve been busy the last couple of weeks here at Guilford Dining. First there was Feed the Difference, then Food Week, which finished with our fall Meadow Fed Dinner. Everything was a shining success, and judging by the turnout, you guys really enjoyed yourselves. I thought it might be nice to take just a minute to enjoy some pictures from all these great events in the last couple of weeks.

Here we go, enjoy!

Fall MeadowFed 12
GC Food Week 12
Feed The Difference 2012 GC

News on the Local Front

 

What’s local right now?
Starting this week we’re making some big changes in our local purchasing. From now on all of our chicken and eggs, and one of our salad greens will be local EVERY DAY!

Eggs

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Here at Guilford Dining we think it doesn’t matter which came first as long as both are good clean local food. All of our eggs come from the Carolina Egg Companies, out of Nashville, NC. Carolina Egg Companies, a subsidiary of Braswell Foods, is a fourth generation family owned company  that has been producing eggs and egg products for American families and businesses for over 45 years.

Braswell Foods, one of the largest organic feed and egg producers in the United States, is very proud to be American Humane Certified by the American Humane Association, (the nation’s original monitoring and labeling program) which ensures the humane care of farm animals; as well as, receiving the ISO 14001 Certification for its industry leadership as an environmental steward.

All of the pasteurized eggs used for omelets, scrambled eggs, and other dishes come from The Carolina Egg Companies.

All of our shell eggs used for fried or scrambled eggs also come from the Carolina Egg Companies, and are Cage Free and American Humane Certified.

Fun Fact
Eggs are all-natural, and one egg has lots of vitamins and minerals—all for 70 calories. The nutrients in eggs can play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health and more.

Chicken

All of our fresh chicken comes from Hopkins Poultry. This family owned business based out of Browns Summit, NC has been selling poultry for generations. All of the chicken is hand cut, a dying art in these days where machines do just about everything.

Buying from local companies like Hopkins Poultry keeps more of the money spent in our communities. It also reduces the distance food has to travel from farm to fork, which means fresher, tastier food, and a lower carbon footprint.

Fun NC Poultry Facts

• Poultry is the #1 Agricultural Industry in North Carolina

• North Carolina is ranked #3 Nationally in Total Poultry Production

• Over 5,700 Farm Families produce Poultry & Eggs in NC

*Information from the http://www.ncpoultry.org/facts

Did you know?
The average American consumes 90 pounds of chicken, 17 pounds of turkey, and, 20 dozen eggs per year. Americans eat chicken more than any other meat.

Salad Greens

Salad: the  carnivore’s nemesis, or a vegetarian’s delight? Well, not all salads are created equal. Guilford Dining is committed to providing 1 choice of local salad greens EVERY DAY. As the seasons change, so do the varieties of greens available. Sometimes we’ll have a tender mix of greens that could be sweet or spice, other times it will be chopped head lettuces, or arugula. This offering will change at least every few weeks, if not sooner.

Here are just a few of the places we will be buying salad greens from throughout the year.

Cottle Organics

Cottle Organics Video

Cottle Organics is a 40 acre farm that has been certified organic since 2007. Located on I-40 in Rose Hill, 35 miles north of Wilmington, it is owned and operated by Herbie Cottle. Having been raised on a family farm, Herbie continues the family tradition of growing vegetables of the highest quality. His produce harvested at the peak of ripeness, flavor, and nutritional content is better for you and your family’s health. Cottle Organics uses sustainable farming practices without the use of chemical fertilizers, herbicides or synthetic pesticides. These organic practices benefit the environment and Cottle Organics is dedicated to saving the environment for future generations.

Faucette Farm
Faucette Farms has a rich heritage in North Carolina dating back to the early 1900’s. The farms was founded as a small family tobacco farm with minimal amounts of produce. Throughout seven generations, the Faucette’s have poured their love, energy and respect into the land in order to squeeze out just enough to support their families. Thanks to the hard work of loyal employees, the farm has been able to grow exponentially in comparison to its humble beginnings. Today, Faucette Farms is also able to supply produce to a multitude of families in the community and other establishments.

The Guilford Farm
The Guilford College Farm is a perfect example of stewardship in practice. The farm gives our students more options for healthier food by providing fresh produce for Guilford Dining Services, sells extra produce to local restaurants like Elizabeth’s Pizza and Lucky 32, and donates extra food to non-profit organizations like Backpack Beginnings, which focuses on eliminating child hunger in our community. The farm also participates in a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, so members of the Guilford community can buy shares in the CSA and receive a box of vegetables every week throughout the farming season. The program was so popular this year that a waiting list had to be created! But don’t worry if you didn’t make it on to the waiting list; every week, we host the Guilford Farmers Market on campus, where the farm sells extra produce and local farmers are also invited to the market to sell their crops to the Guilford community. You can find out more information on their Facebook page and in a recent article in The Guilfordian.

Eastern Carolina Organics
We market and distribute wholesale Carolina organic farm produce to retailers, restaurants and buying clubs. We think (heck, we KNOW) that a sustainable food system is based on providing fresh local fruit, vegetables, and herbs while protecting the environment.
We’re farmer-owned and we act like it. Eighty percent of our sales go right back to our growers. Our customers get fresh organic veggies and fruits, along with the knowledge that they’re enabling farmers to protect their family land.
By pooling diverse harvests from several regions, we’re able to meet the demand for a steady stream of high-quality, seasonal food choices throughout the year.

“We were born in 2004 as a project of the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association (CFSA) and a recipient of a $48,000 Tobacco Trust Fund Commission grant. The goal of CFSA then is our mission now—to support emerging organic farmers and organic tobacco farmers while improving the supply of local organic produce.
In 2005, we became a private, grower- and manager-owned LLC with 13 grower and 2 staff owners. Today, ECO works with over 40 growers and 100 customers.
In 2011, CFSA recognized ECO as its Business of the Year, stating, “ECO is honored for their commitment to helping sustainable family farms thrive in the Carolinas.”

Trash Talk – Water saving tips

October 30, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

Water Saving Tips

Take a shorter shower – for every 2 minutes you trim off your shower time, you can conserve more than 10 gallons of water.
Turn off the tap while you brush your teeth – you’ll save up to 5 gallons per day. Throughout the US that could add up to 1.5 billion gallons per day – more than is consumed in NYC each day!
Dishwasher math – run full loads, and don’t pre-rinse dishes. Do both and you could save up to 20 gallons of water per load, as much as 7,300 gallons over a year. That is as  much as the average person drinks in a LIFETIME!

Think about it!
Will you take a small step to help?

Source: The Green Book

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules…. Avoid food products that contain high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)

October 23, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

Food Rules…. Avoid food products that contain high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)

  • Packaged foods containing HFCS are reliable markers for highly processed foods
  • HFCS is added to foods not traditionally sweetened; avoiding them will cut sugar intake
  • Sugar is sugar.  “NO HFCS” & “Real Cane Sugar” claims wrongly imply these products are healthier.

Source: Michael Pollen Food Rules

 

Food Week & Our Fall MeadowFed

 

 Tomorrow we begin celebrating Food Week here at Guilford. Students came up with the idea of turning National Food Day into a week long event with movies, speakers, cooking demos, a farmers market here on campus, a fermentation dinner, and of course, or bi-annual Meadow Fed dinner at the Guilford Farm.

Learn more about each of the events here or here.

Having a whole week of events celebrating food, and educating people about where it comes from and how that affects our bodies and planet is my bread and butter. That’s why I’m here. But by far my favorite part of the whole thing is the Meadow Fed Dinner.

Last year at about this time a student, Bennett Christian, came to us hoping to do a dinner at the farm to celebrate the end of the harvest season, and give the Guilford community a chance to enjoy its young farm. Since that dinner we’ve done three more. This farm meal thing has taken on a mind of its own, and now we’re going to be doing four or five of them a year! Almost everything we serve at these meals comes from the Guilford Farm or other North Carolina farms and family owned businesses.

The idea of farm to table can be abstract, and easy to ignore if you’re not already tuned into the locavore movement. There is nothing abstract about eating vegetables while sitting just a few yards away from where they grew. Even the most traditional of eaters knows somewhere down in their gut that being close to the earth that your food came from, and the people that grew it is a good thing. That experience feeds people in a way that fast food can never hope to.

I could ramble on about how amazing the food will be, or how it will change your life, but won’t. Don’t take my word for it, find out for yourself. Join us this Thursday at the Guilford Farm (past the soccer field and the New Garden Friends School) from 5-7:30pm for some tasty local food and good company.

The sweet side of bitter greens

October 17, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

This past week hasn't provided much inspiration for meals given my oldest son Oliver has been laid up with the GI bug.  In between cleaning up messes I haven't exactly been inspired to prepare gourmet meals in the kitchen.  However, I still need to eat, and despite some unpleasant scents (before cleaning with a vengeance) my hunger has not dissipated.  In a lucky turn of events, I received an abundance of greens from our CSA, and at the same time I stumbled upon this 'no cook' method for bitter greens. This is a delicious, quick way to prepare kale, spinach and any other green that comes your way.  The beauty is that I can prepare the greens in 2 minutes flat and sit down and enjoy a nutritious meal.  Yesterday I made the greens, boiled some whole wheat pasta and voila, my dinner.  Of course, now that Oliver is back to feeling well I expect "bitter" greens will not be on the nightly menu (well maybe just for me).

Source: eatingwell

Curried Pumpkin Mousse

Curried Pumpkin Mousse
Makes 3 cups

1/4c – minced shallot
2T – unsalted butter
2 1/2t –
curry powder
2t – chopped fresh thyme
2c – canned solid-pack pumpkin
8oz – local goat cheese, softened
3 –
heads belgian endive
1/2c – walnuts or pepetitas, lightly toasted & finely chopped

  1. Cook shallot in butter over low heat, stir, until soft
  2. Add curry, S&P
  3. Continue cooking & stirring for 1 minute
  4. Puree pumpkin & goat cheese
  5. Add shallot mixture & chopped thyme
  6. Chill, pipe onto ends of endive leaves, sprinkle with nuts

You may also serve as a dip with other vegetables, sliced local

 

November recipe: Curried Pumpkin Mousse

Curried Pumpkin Mousse
Makes 3 cups

1/4c - minced shallot
2T - unsalted butter
2 1/2t -
curry powder
2t - chopped fresh thyme
2c - canned solid-pack pumpkin
8oz - local goat cheese, softened
3 -
heads belgian endive
1/2c - walnuts or pepetitas, lightly toasted & finely chopped

  1. Cook shallot in butter over low heat, stir, until soft
  2. Add curry, S&P
  3. Continue cooking & stirring for 1 minute
  4. Puree pumpkin & goat cheese
  5. Add shallot mixture & chopped thyme
  6. Chill, pipe onto ends of endive leaves, sprinkle with nuts

You may also serve as a dip with other vegetables, sliced local