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C-Mo’s Movie Review: Fathead

I love movies and documentaries.  Over break I watched a movie called “Fat Head”.  It’s streaming on Netflix right now.  It’s a movie that shook things up with me.  Basically the movie was a scientific study to disprove the assertions made in the film “Supersize Me”.  In “Supersize Me” the host eats nothing but fast food for 30 days, he gains around 30 pounds, his cholesterol shoots up, and his liver enzymes go off the chart.  In “Fat Head” the host eats nothing but fast food for 28 days and he loses 12 pounds, his cholesterol goes down 10 points, and his energy level shoots up. How is this possible?  Of course there is more going on behind the scenes, but it’s definitely worth checking out.

I’m like most people:  when I hear a convincing argument regarding a subject I tend to believe it, especially when it is backed by studies and experts.  This sounds reasonable, right?  Well, what do you do when conflicting sides of an argument are backed by the same studies? Polar opposites with equal scientific proof? What I am getting at is diet, more specifically vegetarian, vegan, low-protein diets versus a low carbohydrate, carnivorous diet.   In the book “The China Study”, the author uses the “Framingham” study to make his point that an omnivorous, high protein diet, leads to heart disease and high mortality.  In the film “Fat Head”, they use the same study to prove that there is no difference in mortality.  The difference is that in the “China Study” which was published in 2006 they quoted research from 1961.  And in “Fat Head” they quoted research from 1997.  Which is accurate?  The FDA says one thing and some expert says another.  And then we’re off on conspiracy tangents — big business is forcing the FDA to recommend their foods in greater proportion than others, or the pharmacies recommending diets that ultimately create a need for their prescription medicines.

Of course I wouldn’t recommend a diet in this forum, but I would suggest watching “Fat Head.”   For me, I’ve always carried extra weight.  About 10 years ago I lost 80 pounds on the “Atkin’s” diet, eating hardly any carbs, of course I gained it back.  Last year I lost 74 pounds going all vegan, with a high carb diet. And yes, I’ve gained it back.  What’s next, exercise?!?!?!

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