Roasted Carrots with Spicy Yogurt Sauce

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Serves 6

1lb small carrots (colored heirloom best)

1T extra virgin olive oil

s&p

⅓c plain greek yogurt

2t lime juice

1t curry powder

1 pinch cayenne

zest of 1 lime

 

1. Preheat oven to 400°F

2. Toss carrots with olive oil, s&p

3. Roast 30-35 min, turning halfway through

4. Combine yogurt with lime, curry & cayenne

5. Serve yogurt on side of roasted carrots

6. Garnish with lime zest

Spicy Coconut Soup (Tom Kha)

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Serves 4-6

¼c lemongrass, white only (about 6″)

2t garlic

2T grated fresh ginger

1-2t crushed red pepper

1t ground coriander

1t cumin

1c onion, thinly sliced

4c water or chicken stock

10oz can  coconut milk

2t olive oil

1c shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, thinly sliced

2c green cabbage (or bok choy), thinly sliced

¼c chopped cilantro

 

1. Smash stem of lemongrass to release flavor

2. In large pot, combine lemongrass, garlic, ginger, spices, onion, stock & coconut milk. Bring to boil, reduce heat, simmer 15 minutes. Remove Lemongrass

3. Heat oil in sauté pan. Sauté shiitakes, 4 mins

4. Add cabbage to shiitakes, cook 5 mins more

5. Add shiitakes and cabbage to soup

6. Garnish with chopped cilantro

 

Roasted Kale Chips

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Serves 6-8

1 small bunch kale

2-4T canola oil

sea salt

 

1. Preheat oven to 300°F

2. Strip kale off center ribs, tear into 2″ pieces

3. Rinse & dry thoroughly

4. Toss with canola oil, work into leaves until shiny

5. Spread on baking sheets in shallow layer; season lightly with salt

6. Bake 10 mins, rotate pan & bake 15 mins more, until crispy

Asian Pear Salad

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Serves 6-8

zest & juice of 1 orange

½ bunch scallions, thinly sliced on bias

1 pinch sea salt

¼c tamarind juice

¾c salad oil

2-3 asian pears, very thinly sliced

6-8c asian style greens or mesclun 

 

1. Combine zest & juice of orange, scallions, salt * tamarind juice.

2. Whisk in oil

3. Toss pears with dressing. Toss greens with dressing. Layer on platter

4. Serve chilled

Skillet Pot Pie with Butternut & Kale

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Serves 8

¼c olive oil

1c frozen white pearl onions. thawed

2t minced fresh garlic

1T chopped fresh sage

1small  bunch kale, ribs & stems removed, leaves chopped

¼c all-purpose flour

3c low-sodium chicken broth

2c butternut squash, peeled, cut ½” lieces

2c rotisserie chicken, meat torn bit-size pieces

s&p

1 sheet puff pastry, thawed

1 egg

1. Preheat oven to 425°F

2. Heat oil in cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add onion; sauté 4 mins

3. Reduce heat to med-low, add garlic & sage, stir 2 mins

4. Add kale, cook & stir until wilted, 4 mins

5. Whisk in flour, cook 4 mins

6. Whisk in broth, ½c at a time; add squash & bring to boil

7. Reduce heat, simmer squash 8-10 mins, until soft

8. Add chicken, s&p. Simmer to heat chicken. Taste/adjust seasoning

9. Unfold puff pastry, smooth creases, place over skillet

10. Whisk egg & 1t water, brush on pastry, cut 4 slits to vent

11. Bake 15 – 20 mins, until pastry begins to brown

12. Reduce heat to 375°F, bake 15 – 20 mins more, until brown

Puff pastry brands: Dufour or Pepperidge Farm

Smoked Trout & Crispy Apple Salad

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Serves 8

1 granny smith apple, very thinly sliced

2t sugar

2qts baby greens

¾ apple cider or lemon vinaigrette

½lb skinless smoked trout, flaked, pin bones removed

4oz smoked gouda, julienne

¼c red onion, thinly sliced

¼c toasted pecans

1. Preheat oven to 300°F

2. Core & thinly slice apple

3. Lay on well sprayed baking

sheet, sprinkle lightly with sugar

4. Bake until apples brown &

crispy, 30+ mins

5. Cool, remove with spatula

6. Toss greens in vinaigrette,

top with trout, gouda, onions,

pecans & crispy apples

Notes: Mandoline is best for slicing apple super thin, but sharp knife works. Recipe for Apple Cider Vinaigrette in September. Delicious sub for trout is rotiserrie zhicken

 

Give Thanks

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As I was preparing to write this blog, I came across the usual array of articles about holiday weight gain, including one about how much exercise is required to burn off your Thanksgiving dinner. Rather than add to the litany of advice about holiday eating (and guilt) I have decided this year to focus on what Thanksgiving is all about: giving thanks. 

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday where we celebrate with friends & family, coming together for a meal of traditional favorites. Many of us have foods we prepare each year that bring us a great deal of comfort & memories. For me personally, my favorite Thanksgiving dish is Corn Bread, Wild Mushroom & Pecan Stuffing. This dish is filled with lots of hearty goodness. I add extra veggies & skip the heavy cream lending to a decent nutritional profile. 

So this Thanksgiving rather than obsessing about the calories you put in your mouth, enjoy time with friends & family, go for a walk (or turkey trot), be mindful of the quantity of food your consume (no “thanksgiving full” this year) & quite simply, give thanks.

A look at our a-maize-ing cafeteria staff

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Article from The Guilfordian

This article is part of a series highlighting the often overlooked amount of work that goes into keeping our campus fed.

Founders Dining Hall. The Cafeteria. The Caf. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, this place is a staple of the Guilford experience.

At some point or another, we have all enjoyed a meal there, shared a smile with the staff or ate way too much ice-cream from the ice-cream bar — guilty.

How many of us, however, have actually thought about the work that goes into it all?

“There are a lot of things that I think the community doesn’t see,” said Long Nghiem, district manager of Meriwether Godsey, the company that caters Guilford’s dining halls.

“All the hard work that (the dining staff) does is fantastic. They’re committed, and it really is a true partnership with the students. They love the community and they’re here to serve it.”

From planning menus and purchasing ingredients to preparing and serving three meals a day, a lot of work goes into running the dining halls here on campus.

“When you have to produce, for example, mashed potatoes for 1,000 people, that’s a big deal,” said Nghiem. “Think about when you’re at Thanksgiving and you have a family of about 20 people over, multiply that by 50 — for breakfast, lunch and dinner.”

Planning for each semester begins immediately following graduation, which allows dining services to operate more smoothly throughout the year.

“The operation is smooth and it is efficient, and becomes effective because there is a lot of planning and a lot of organization that goes into it,” said Snehal Deshmukh, director of dining services. “It simply becomes a matter of executing an operation”

The cafeteria’s menus prioritize balance and variety, things that, as a company, Meriwether Godsey strives to provide.

“The misconception we often hear is that we don’t want to (serve something), or that we can’t do it or don’t know how to, but that’s not the case,” said Nghiem. “We’re constantly trying to bring balance and to please the entire community. It’s our due diligence to prepare healthy made-from-scratch food.”

On top of all of this, dining services has also dedicated itself to promoting sustainability here on campus. Deshmukh’s team has even collaborated with the on-campus farm as a supplier for fresh produce.

“This partnership serves as an example of how local food can be incorporated into institutional kitchen settings,” said Nicholas Mangili, farmer and employee of the Sustainability Department. “If a farmer can meet the demand, institutions serve as great markets for local food expansion.

“For myself and the students that work and volunteer on the farm, it’s great to walk in for lunch and see the hard work of the farm and the cafeteria come together for a great meal.”

Dining services and its staff are clearly dedicated to the students here at our school.

“Food service is a very passionate job,” said Desmukh. “You have to have great passion for it. It is, however, a very gratifying (experience). Students on campus really come to know us and we really come to know the students. We become a family.”

As a community, we should try to be more mindful of the work they all do for us every day. They are, after all, a part of the family.

 

Cast Iron Skillet Pizza

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Serves 16

1 whole wheat pizza dough ball

6 slices thick cut bacon, chopped

1 shallot, sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 lb brussels stemmed, thinly sliced

1/4t s&p

8 oz mixed provolone & fontina,

2 T grated finely grated parmesan

1. Preheat broiler

2. Cook bacon until crispy, drain on paper towel, reserve 2T bacon fat

3. Sauté shallots, garlic & brussels in bacon fat, s&p, 6-8 mins.

4. On stove top, heat 10-12″ cast iron skillet, high heat, 10 mins

5. On floured pizza peel, roll-out dough to skillet diameter

6. Slide dough into very hot cast iron skillet

7. Cook dough 2-3 mins, until browned, turn over

8. Top dough with brussels, bacon, cheeses

9. Slide into broiler. Cook 1 min, rotate 180 ̊, cook 1 min more

Note: cast iron skillet handle gets VERY HOT! Touch only with thick pot holder!

 

Our Relationship with Food

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When it comes to eating very few of us would argue that our relationship with food has many psychological components.  Eating based on only physical cues (i.e. physiological hunger) can be a challenge in today’s world.  Many of us use emotions, social cues, etc. to choose when & what to eat. The past few months I have been reviewing intuitive Eating Principles for my practice & the message that has resonated with me is “permission,” permission to eat, permission to actually enjoy food. That is why I loved this recent blog from Raise Healthy Eaters, which highlights the change in our relationship with food when we actually give ourselves permission to eat

  • I give myself permission to not have chocolate cake because it just doesn’t sound good.
  • I give myself permission to work out because it will enhance my day, even with an out-of-control to-do list.
  • I give myself permission to skip my work out because it will only add more stress to an already packed day.
  • I give myself permission to have coffee with a friend because I need connection, even though time is limited.
  • I give myself permission to cancel with a friend because it’s just one of those days.
  • I give myself permission to blow off my Sunday to-do’s (grocery shopping, getting ready for the week) and stay in my PJs with my kids, order take out and watch a movie because I just know I need a break.
  • I give myself permission to spend much of my Sunday getting ready for the week because I know it’s going to be a crazy week.
  • I give myself permission to pursue an interest or different career even though it will sound crazy to my family and friends.
  • I give myself permission to focus on what I’m doing now, and not feel like I have to do anything more to impress anyone.

As you can see, this advice does not just apply to food, so go ahead, give yourself permission.

 

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